Principal Supplement September/October 2015: Champion Creatively Alive Children

Building upon the success they have witnessed in the field, principals across the nation are adopting art-infused education as a schoolwide vision. Research documents that art-integration can have a transformative effect on schools by improving school culture and increasing student achievement. In addition to improved test scores and attendance rates, principals report increased family engagement and teacher collaboration when the arts are at the core of schools’ pedagogy and mission. Principals’ passion for art-integration is creating a movement others are eager to join. Crayola and NAESP are thrilled to capture this passion in the stories of Creatively Alive grant-winning schools, each of which excels with innovative teaching and learning practices.

This is the fifth year that NAESP and Crayola have teamed up to develop this special supplement to Principal, as part of a mission to support arts-infused education. Visit the Champion Creatively Alive Children page to learn more about these efforts and how they could help your school through grants and free professional development.

Click here to read the digital edition.

 


Teaching By Design
Design Thinking is a problem-solving strategy that helps build students’ 21st century skills.

Lessons Learned
Five ways to integrate arts in education.

Creating a Movement
Two principals share their journey toward art-integration.

Art Connects
Art builds understanding of self, peers, and other cultures.

New Era of Family Engagement
Art-integrated strategies get parents involved in schools.

Research Shows That Art Turns Around Schools
A new report reveals the benefits of the arts in low-performing schools.

Tech Trends Paint View of the Future
Insight on what’s to come suggests the need for more creativity and innovation.

Students as Teachers
Empowering students to teach each other can transform schools.

20 Innovative Ideas
From the 2014-2015 Champion Creatively Alive Children grant winners.

 


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