We continue today with reflections from principals about how NCLB is impacting their schools. Principal Olaf Jorgenson moved from public to private school leadership in large part because he disagreed with NCLB, especially as it was administered in Arizona. “My current school does not accept a penny of federal funding, or any federal grants, even though we are on a shoestring each year and are able to operate only based on our tuition (which covers about 70% of our costs), our ability to attract groups to use our facilities during vacations and summers for revenue, and our (my) ability to fundraise,” said Jorgenson.  “But I see my fellow principals in my former district really struggling with NCLB as it impacts children and teachers.”  Jorgenson said that if he could speak to members of Congress about NCLB he would tell them: “If we must rely on test scores so heavily, then I'm a huge proponent of gauging a teacher's success (a school's success) based on how much a child grows in an academic year.  If the teacher gets 100% of kids to progress at least one academic year, that's impressive.”

Yesterday, Principal Jan Borelli shared how NCLB has impacted her school. Borelli says that if she could speak to members of Congress about NCLB, she would tell them: “I think if anyone really looks at what makes a great class, it’s all about what the teacher can bring out of his or her students. I think if anyone really looks at what makes a great school, it’s all about what the principal can bring out of his or her teachers. I would like to see more support for the training and continuing development of principals.”

Jorgenson and Borelli offer some profound thoughts on NCLB. Tell us what you think. How has NCLB impacted your school? What would you say to members of Congress about NCLB?

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