Have you read the latest Speaking Out article in Principal magazine? Author Carolyn Bunting argues that principals should rely less on the use of research-based programs in the classroom and instead allow good teachers to simply teach. “Good teaching is too diverse to be captured in prescribed programs, no matter what the research may say,” Bunting writes. “A better alternative is to give teachers the time and resources to find their own way.”

She adds: “The process begins with principals trusting their teachers and themselves. Then begins the slow and careful work of giving teachers the breathing room they need to develop independently.”

Do you agree with Bunting? Are your teachers locked in to research-based programs? Do you believe classroom instruction would improve if teachers were allowed to use their own methods?

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

I do not believe that good teachers need research based learning to be successful in the classroom. I feel that good teachers have a sense of what their students need and can deliver. The problem is not necessarily dealing with good teachers, because they will be successful in any setting, the problem is the subpar teachers. I believe that they need research based learning, and even then, they may still struggle.

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

I believe that there needs to be some researched bases in what we are teaching. However, what teachers need to realize is that there is still variety in the way that they teach : standards, curriculum, and even 'to the test.' So amny times I hear "I would like to do something fun but can't because I have to stick with the curriculum and it's pacing guide." Yeah, so what! Teachers need to remember that as long as they can get the same concept through to the students, then they can be creative. Let's not forget why many of us became teachers and what that the main focus is to have fun and have student learning.

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

I believe that there needs to be some researched bases in what we are teaching. However, what teachers need to realize is that there is still variety in the way that they teach : standards, curriculum, and even 'to the test.' So amny times I hear "I would like to do something fun but can't because I have to stick with the curriculum and it's pacing guide." Yeah, so what! Teachers need to remember that as long as they can get the same concept through to the students, then they can be creative. Let's not forget why many of us became teachers and what that the main focus is to have fun and have student learning.

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

I agree with the author to a large degree. I feel that curriculums have become very scripted. The best (effective) teachers are the ones who practice the "Art" of instruction. They are professional educators and not just good script readers. I do certainly see a place for research based and data driven criteria, but let's no forget that teaching is a profession and our teachers can and should be the key to a child's success!

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

I just posted a small rant about a "research based practice",so I tend to agree with the author the article. However, a good administrator knows that some teachers operate better with a little bit of coloring outside of the lines. As long as a teacher can match their objective to standards, should an administrator mind if they varied from the script a little bit? Most of the great comedic movies are ad-lib, shouldn't teachers be allowed to do that?

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

Let's face it... a good teacher is a good teacher. Some have what it takes to communicate and deal with their students. Others may need more time on the job, or may need to try something else.Don't you agree?

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

After reading Carolyn Bunting’s article, I see the value in both sides of the argument. As for myself, I disagree with the blanket statement “principals should rely less on the use of research-based programs in the classroom and instead allow good teachers to simply teach”. However, I do agree with many of the suggestions that she offers on behalf of fostering success among individuals that aspire to be good teachers. The key to breaking down this issue at large depends upon the actual research-based programs that are being mandated and to which degree does that program prohibit individualism. An important factor in this ordeal is that the administrators that determine which programs are used, have classroom experiences and a level of understanding that influences their decisions rationally opposed to merely statistically.
Implementing researched –based programs offer the instructors a foundation that may increase effectiveness in the classroom if it is executed correctly. As a former instructor at a business school, we were required to follow a research-based format with accompanying applications. Each semester, we were evaluated by an administrator to observe if we followed that protocol. This program was instituted in early 2007 and is still in place today. Each term administrators compare statistical data from the previous semesters and those semesters before the program was introduced. At in-services the information and results were presented to see the areas of progression and regression with our students. The most interesting part of this new system was that within fulfilling its guidelines, we were encouraged to implement our own unique style and methods to instructing our classes.
In summation, I do believe that some form of research based program should be in place, but do not rely more on the program than the teachers’ expertise. In addition to that, allow each program time to grow on the teachers and students. After all, the bottom line should be success for the students.

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

After reading Carolyn Bunting’s article, I see the value in both sides of the argument. As for myself, I disagree with the blanket statement “principals should rely less on the use of research-based programs in the classroom and instead allow good teachers to simply teach”. However, I do agree with many of the suggestions that she offers on behalf of fostering success among individuals that aspire to be good teachers. The key to breaking down this issue at large depends upon the actual research-based programs that are being mandated and to which degree does that program prohibit individualism. An important factor in this ordeal is that the administrators that determine which programs are used, have classroom experiences and a level of understanding that influences their decisions rationally opposed to merely statistically.
Implementing researched –based programs offer the instructors a foundation that may increase effectiveness in the classroom if it is executed correctly. As a former instructor at a business school, we were required to follow a research-based format with accompanying applications. Each semester, we were evaluated by an administrator to observe if we followed that protocol. This program was instituted in early 2007 and is still in place today. Each term administrators compare statistical data from the previous semesters and those semesters before the program was introduced. At in-services the information and results were presented to see the areas of progression and regression with our students. The most interesting part of this new system was that within fulfilling its guidelines, we were encouraged to implement our own unique style and methods to instructing our classes.
In summation, I do believe that some form of research based program should be in place, but do not rely more on the program than the teachers’ expertise. In addition to that, allow each program time to grow on the teachers and students. After all, the bottom line should be success for the students.

re: Good Teachers Don’t Need Research-based Programs

I can understand the philosophy of letting good teachers teach, however I think there is some relevance on using research based techniques. As a special educator I use a lot of curriculum that is researched based such as DI. I find it easier to collaborate with parents when informing them of their son or daughter’s progress when compared to research based techniques. If I were to sit down with a parent and explain to them that there son or daughter is not making the progress that they expected to them to, it would not be easy to validate my instruction style as being adequate because I am a good teacher. I believe a good teacher needs research based techniques as much as these techniques need a good teacher. To be a good teacher you rely on different programs and your intuition as a teacher to decide what is in the best interest of that student and their particular learning styles.